Plugins


Plugins are objects used to extend and modify the behavior of the CMS.

All plugins must conform to the Plugin interface:

interface Plugin {
  __type: string // Identifies how the plugin should be used
  name: string //   Unique identifier for the plugin
}

Beyond these properties, a plugin may contain other properties depend on it's __type. Here are some of the types of plugins currently availble:

Plugin TypeDescription
formConnect a form to the sidebar & toolbar UIs
fieldSimplify the form creation process.
content-creatorAdd options to the "Add Content" menu.
screenComponents that are rendered in overlays and modals. Accessible from menu.
toolbar:widgetComponents that are rendered in the toolbar.

Adding Plugins

Call cms.plugins.add and pass in the plugin.

import { TinaCMS } from 'tinacms'
import { HtmlFieldPlugin, MarkdownFieldPlugin } from 'react-tinacms-editor'

const cms = new TinaCMS({ enabled: true })

cms.plugins.add(HtmlFieldPlugin)
cms.plugins.add(MarkdownFieldPlugin)

Alternatively, you can call the usePlugins hook from inside a function component.

import * as React from 'react'
import { usePlugins } from 'tinacms'
import { HtmlFieldPlugin, MarkdownFieldPlugin } from 'react-tinacms-editor'

export function SomeComponent({ children }) {
  usePlugins([HtmlFieldPlugin, MarkdownFieldPlugin])

  return <div>{children}</div>
}

When adding plugins from inside a React component, the plugin is added when the component mounts, and removed when the component unmounts. This is both expected and encouraged, as Tina has a Dynamic Plugin System.

Adding Plugins in Gatsby

Another way to add TinaCMS plugins when using Gatsby is via onClientEntry function in gatsby-browser.js. The package gatsby-plugin-tinacms attaches the cms to the window it can be accessed from this function.

gatsby-browser.js

import { MyPlugin } from './src/cms/MyPlugin'

export const onClientEntry = () => {
  window.tinacms.plugins.add(MyPlugin)
}

Adding Plugins Dynamically

In some cases, you may not want plugins to be included in the initial JavaScript file/bundle of your website, as some plugins can be quite large. In these scenarios, you can import the plugins dynamically, and the plugins will only be downloaded when they are needed.

import { TinaCMS } from 'tinacms'
import { HtmlFieldPlugin, MarkdownFieldPlugin } from 'react-tinacms-editor'

const cms = new TinaCMS({ enabled: true })

import('react-tinacms-editor').then(
  ({ HtmlFieldPlugin, MarkdownFieldPlugin }) => {
    cms.plugins.add(HtmlFieldPlugin)
    cms.plugins.add(MarkdownFieldPlugin)
  }
)

If you're using React this can be done inside of a component:

import * as React from 'react'
import { usePlugins } from 'tinacms'

export function SomeComponent({ children }) {
  React.useEffect(() => {
    import('react-tinacms-editor').then(
      ({ HtmlFieldPlugin, MarkdownFieldPlugin }) => {
        cms.plugins.add(HtmlFieldPlugin)
        cms.plugins.add(MarkdownFieldPlugin)
      }
    )
  }, [])

  return <div>{children}</div>
}

Accessing Plugins

You can access all plugins of a given type by calling cms.plugins.all(type)

import * as React from 'react'
import { useCMS } from 'tinacms'

export function Hello() {
  const cms = useCMS()
  const sayHello = React.useCallback(() => {
    // get all of the "hello" plugins.
    const helloPlugins = cms.plugins.all('hello')

    // iterate over all of the "hello" plugins
    helloPlugins.forEach(plugin => alert(`Hello, ${plugin.user}!`))
  }, [])
  return <button onClick={sayHello}>Say Hello</button>
}